Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Deutsch Dutch English Espanol Francais Greek Hindi Italiano Japanese Magyar Polski
Portugues Romana Russian Turkish Ukrainian
News  -  Calendar  -  Call for Papers  -  Studies & Position Papers  -  Acta Astronautica  -  Commissions  -  Study Groups
Path of current page Home arrow Membership arrow Obituary Thursday, 21 September 2017
Site Search
Obituary Column Print

We regret to inform you of the passing of:

- 06 August 2017: Chen Huaijin, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 27 July 2017: Amnon Ginati, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 25 July 2017: Yash Pal, India, member of Social Sciences section

- 24 July 2017: U.R. Rao, India, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 21 June 2017: Zhu Yilin, China, member of Social Sciences section

- 24 May 2017: Giovanni Bignami, Italy, member of Basic Sciences section

- 08 April 2017: Georgi Grechko, Russia, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 12 February 2017: Ren Xinmin, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 18 December 2016: Andre Jaumotte, Belgium, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 08 December 2016: John H. Glenn, Jr., USA, Honorary member

- 15 September 2016: Jacques Villain, France, member of Social Sciences section

- 29 August 2016: Hermann Strub, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 28 July 2016: Douglas A. O'Handley, USA, member of Life Sciences section

- 19 June 2016: Horst Rauck, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 30 April 2016: Jean-Charles Poggi, France, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 18 April 2016: Dietrich Rex, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 14 April 2016: Liang Si-Li, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 07 April 2016: Herve Moulin, France, member of Social Sciences section

- 25 March 2016: Martti Tiuri, Finland, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 19 March 2016: Angelo Miele, USA, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 26 January 2016: Makoto Igarashi, Japan, member of Life Sciences section


Obituary year 2015 is available in the History Section of the website



 06 August 2017: Chen Huaijin, China, member of Engineering Sciences section (1929-2017)

Prof. Chen Huaijin was one of the pioneers and founders of China's space industry, and a famous expert in radar technology and rocket control system. On August 6, 2017, Prof. Chen Huaijin died at the age of 88. In March 1957, he joined in the Fifth Academy of the Ministry of National Defense, and successively held positions as Vice President of the Second Academy of the Ministry of Space Industry, Chief Engineer, Chief Designer of Stimulation Engineering and Deputy Director of S&T Committee of Ministry of Space Industry, as well as the Chair of Military Stimulation Professional Research Group of State Commission of Science and Technology for National Defense Industry. He served as Adjunct Professor of Harbin Institute of Technology, Vice President of Chinese Society of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle of Chinese Society of Astronautics and Vice President of China Academy of System Stimulation. He has been engaged in the research and development of China's radar technology and rocket control system for a long time. He has won the First Prize of National Prize for Progress in Science and Technology, and the First Prize for Progress in Aeronautical and Astronautical Science and Technology. He was elected Full Member in 2001 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA member Amnon Ginati
27 July 2017: Amnon Ginati, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section (1953-2017)

We have learned with great sadness the passing of Professor Amnon Ginati, Full Member Section 2 Engineering Sciences of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) on July 27, 2017. He was the Head of the Earth Observation Future Programmes Department at ESA / ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands. He contributed significantly to a number of German and international space projects and concepts. He advanced new ideas for small satellite missions and combined industry and university activities to pursue space science and application projects. He established industry joint projects and university cooperation’s research activities with entities from USA, Israel, China, Russia and other countries. He initiated and managed the micro-satellite TUBSAT of the Technical University of Berlin. Author of 50 publications and 3 patents. He was elected Corresponding Member in 2002 and Full Member in 2005 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA member Yash Pal

25 July 2017: Yash Pal, India, member of Social Sciences section (1926-2017)

We have learned with great sadness the passing of Professor Yash Pal, Full Member Section 4 Social Sciences of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) on July 25, 2017. In the 1970s, as director of the Space Applications Centre, a wing of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) set up to conceptualise applications for satellite technology for societal needs, Pal put together a team of young scientists from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Mumbai to develop remote-sensing technologies, disregarding suggestions that scientists be sent to the U.S. for training. He began his career as a professor at the TIFR. He went on to hold several senior position in government as Chief Consultant with the Planning Commission from in 1983, Secretary, Department of Science and Technology from 1984 to 1986) and as chairman of the University Grants Commission (UGC) for five years from 1986 to 1991. A scientist of international repute, Prof. Pal was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1976 and India’s second highest civilian honour, the Padma Vibhushan, in 2013. He made significant contributions in the field of science and to the study of cosmic rays, high-energy physics and astrophysics. A well known science communicator, Prof. Yash Pal brought galaxies and cosmic rays to living rooms across India via ‘Turning Point’, an extremely popular science show on Doordarshan. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1990 and Full Member in 1995 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA member U.R. Rao

24 July 2017: U. Ramachandra Rao, India, member of Engineering Sciences section (1932-2017)

We have learned with great sadness the passing of Professor U.R. Rao, Full Member Section Section 2 Engineering Sciences of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) on July 24, 2017. Prof. Rao was involved in all ISRO missions till date in one capacity or the other. Udupi Ramachandra Rao, the grand old man of Indian space programme, has been active almost until his last days. The celebrated space scientist was the fourth Chairman of the ISRO in its critical formative years between 1984 and 1994. ISRO credits him with establishing the development of indigenous satellite technology, giving thrust to early rocket development efforts with the ASLV and the PSLV. He initiated the development of the medium powered GSLV rocket for two-tonne spacecraft in 1991. Prof. Rao was decorated with Padma Vibhushan in 2017 and the Padma Bhushan in 1976. He is the only Indian to date to have been inducted into the Satellite Hall of Fame, Washington, in 2013 by the Society of Satellite Professionals International. He was awarded the IAA von Karman Award in 2005 and he received the IAA Book Award for the book on ‘Space Technology for Sustainable Development’ in 1997. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1991 and Full Member in 1996 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 21 June 2017: Zhu Yilin, China, member of Social Sciences section (1934-2017)

We have learned with great sadness the passing of Professor Zhu Yilin, Full Member Section Section 4 Social Sciences of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) on June 21, 2017. He was a Research Professor and Secretary General of Science and Technology Commission of Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST), Beijing, China. As a chief designer, he has made contributions for the engineering development of LM-1 launch vehicle and the «SJ-2» scientific satellites. His personal contribution was in the application of systems engineering concepts for the design of those complex systems. He made a major contribution to the development of Chinese scientific satellites, including multi-satellite launched on one rocket. Author of more than 100 publications. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1999 and Full Member in 2004 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
Giovanni Bignami, M1
24 May 2017: Giovanni Bignami, Italy, member of Basic Sciences section

We have learned with great sadness the passing of Professor Giovanni Fabrizio Bignami, or “Nanni” to his friends, current Trustee of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) on Wednesday 24 May 2017, at the age of 73. Giovanni Bignami was the 2014 von Karman Award recipient that he received at the occasion of the second IAA Heads of Space Agencies Summit in Washington DC, USA, where 35 Heads of agencies were present. He joined the Academy in 2000 and was involved in many IAA activities. As past President of Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) he was very active in Academy days during the COSPAR general assembly. He was President of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in Roma, Italy where he was previously the Director of Science. Earlier, he was Director of the Centre d’Etudes Spatiales des Rayonnements in Toulouse (France). He started his career as researcher in astrophysics of high energies and was the principal investigator for the mission "cornerstone" XMM of the European Space Agency. He is a member of the National Academy of Lincei. He was elected Full Member (section 1 Basic Sciences) of the International Academy of Astronautics in 2000.
 
Georgi Grechko, M2
08 April 2017: Georgi Grechko, Russia, member of Engineering Sciences section

A veteran of three spaceflights during the heydey of the Soviet space program, Grechko was also a skilled engineer and an avid popularizer of spaceflight. He finished high school in 1949 and graduated with distinction from Leningrad Military Mechanical Institute (Voenmekh) in 1955, after which he was recruited to work in the Special Design Bureau 1 (OKB-1) outside Moscow, the cradle of the Soviet ballistic missile and space program led by Sergei Korolev. One of Grechko’s early assignments was to calculate trajectories for what would become the world’s first satellite, Sputnik 1. In 1975 he made it into Earth orbit as the flight engineer on  Soyuz 17. On December 10, 1977, Grechko and Yuri Romanenko blasted off onboard Soyuz 26 spacecraft bound to the Salyut 6 space station. In 1985, at the age of 54, Grechko began his third spaceflight onboard Soyuz T-14, which took him to the Salyut 7 orbiting lab for another extended stay. Altogether, on three expeditions to three different Soviet space stations, Grechko logged a total of nearly 135 days in space. For that he was twice named Hero of the Soviet Union, the highest official honor in the nation. After his retirement, Grechko stayed until 1986 at NPO Energia (now RKK Energia), the nation’s prime developer of space vehicles. In May of the same year, he joined the Institute of Biosphere Physics within the Soviet Academy of Sciences, where he served as a cosmonaut researcher until March 1992.
He was elected Full Member (section 2 Engineering Sciences) of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1988.
 IAA Academician Ren Xinmin (M2)12 February 2017: Ren Xinmin, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

Prof. Ren Xinmin was one of the founders of China's "Atomic and hydrogen bombs, missiles and man-made satellite" program. He was an important pioneer of China’s missile and space technologies, a famous expert in space technology and liquid rocket engine technology and received the top honor prize for the fifty-year founding of China’s space industry. He was an Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). Prof. Ren Xinmin was born in December 1915. In 1945, He went to the United States for a Master’s Degree in mechanical engineering and a Doctoral Degree in engineering mechanics in the institute of University of Michigan. After the founding of new China in 1949, Prof. Ren returned to China for the construction of China’s space industry and was responsible for research and testing on liquid rocket. Being the technical lead of launch vehicles, he took charge of the launch of China’s first man-made satellite “Dongfanghong-1”. Afterwards, he served as the chief designer and presided over the development and launches of China’s 6 major space engineering programs, such as experimental satellite communications, practical satellite communications, Fengyun-1 meteorological satellite and commercial launching. Prof. Ren Xinmin was the Vice Minister of National Seventh Machinery Industry, Director of Science and Technology Commission of the Ministry of Space Industry and Senior Technical Consultant of the Ministry of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Since 1979, he was successively elected as the first and second President and the third Honorary President of the Chinese Society of Astronautics (CSA). In 1980, he was elected to be an academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Since 1985, he had served as the Deputy Director of the National Defense Science and Technology Progress Committee and adjunct team leader of space panel. In 1988, he was appointed as member of National Academic Degree Committee by the State Council. Besides, he was offered the adjunct professors by the Harbin Institute of Technology and Nanjing University of Science and Technology. He was elected Full Member (section 2 Engineering Sciences) of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1985.
 
IAA Academician Andre L. Jaumotte (M2)
18 December 2016: Andre Jaumotte, Belgium, member of Engineering Sciences section

André Jaumotte has been a professor and Dean at the Université Libre de Bruxelles, as well as the head of the institute of applied mechanics, institute of aeronautics, vice-chancellor and Chairman of the board of that University. He also served as the chairman of the board of the von Karman Institute of Fluid Dynamics, and a member of the board of directors in the Belgium society of mechanical and environmental engineering. He was elected foreign associate at the French Academy of Sciences - Mechanical and Computer Science section. He was a specialist in fluid mechanics. In addition to his research activities, he has been an expert for 20 years in Belgium and Europe on the assessment of nuclear safety and non-renewable energies. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1964 and Full Member in 1965 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA Honorary Member John Glenn
08 December 2016: John H. Glenn, Jr., USA, Honorary member

John Glenn Jr. was born on July 18, 1921 in Cambridge, Ohio and he died on December 8, 2016 at the age of 95. Before  joining NASA, he was a distinguished fighter pilot in both World War II and Korea. A Marine pilot, he was selected in 1959 for Project Mercury astronaut training. Glenn was selected for the first orbital flight, and on February 20, 1962, he piloted the Mercury-Atlas 6 "Friendship 7" spacecraft on the first manned orbital mission of  the United States. Launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, he completed a successful three-orbit mission around the  earth, reaching a maximum altitude (apogee) of approximately 162 statute miles and an orbital velocity of approximately  17,500 miles per hour. Glenn's "Friendship 7" Mercury spacecraft landed approximately 800 miles southeast of KSC in the  vicinity of Grand Turk Island. Mission duration from launch to impact was 4 hours, 55 minutes, and 23 seconds. He was promoted to the rank of Colonel in October 1964 and retired from  the Marine Corps on January 1, 1965. He was a business executive from 1965 until his election to the United States Senate  in November 1974. Glenn retired from the U.S. Senate in January 1999. In 1998, while still a sitting senator, he became the oldest person to fly in space, and the only one to fly in both the  Mercury and Space Shuttle programs as crew member of the Discovery space shuttle. STS-95 Discovery (October 29 to November 7, 1998) was a 9-day mission during which the crew supported a variety of  research payloads including deployment of the Spartan solar-observing spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital  Systems Test Platform, and investigations on space flight and the aging process. The mission was accomplished in 134  Earth orbits, traveling 3.6 million miles in 213 hours and 44 minutes. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012. He was elected Honorary Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1964.
 
Jacques Villain M4
15 September 2016: Jacques Villain, France, member of Social Sciences section

He was Space Advisor of SAFRAN Company. He was a recognised leader of the history of astronautics and development of spacecraft technology.  A graduate of the technical schools of the French navy, he placed his engineering skills successively at the service of the ballistic and aerodynamic research laboratory in Vernon, the missiles directorate at French defence procurement agency DGA, and companies SEP and then SNECMA. He made a name for himself through his studies into guidance and control of ballistic missiles. Head of corporate communications at SEP, he had also taken an active interest in economic intelligence, heading its Industrial Property department. He has published on American expeditions to the Moon, American/Russian rivalry in space exploration, international military nuclear force, the French deterrent force, exploration of the planet Mars and the possibility of sending humans there. He has received the Social Science Book Award in 1995. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1993 and Full Member in 1998 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA Academician Hermann A.E. Strub (M 2)
29 August 2016: Hermann Strub, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was Director General, Head of Basic Research, Research Coordination, International Cooperation, Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT), Bonn, Germany. He was Deputy Director General, Head of Life Science Programs BMFT. He was also Deputy Director General, Head of Aerospace Programs BMFT. Before that he was Head of Sections (Space and Aeronautical Programs, Research and Technology, Materials, Energy, Propulsion). He was scientist, direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, plasma physics, heat pipes, Joint Research Center of the European Communities (EURATOM), Ispra, Italy. He was assistant Professor at the Technical University of Karlsruhe. He was Officer of the French Legion of Honour and first class Cross of Merit, Germany. He acted as IAA Regional Secretary for Germany. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1989 and Full Member in 1992 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA Academician Douglas A. O'Handley (M3)
28 July 2016: Douglas A. O'Handley, USA, member of Life Sciences section

He worked at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. while receiving his doctorate in Astronomy-Celestial Mechanics at Yale University in 1967. His career began at the Naval Observatory accompanying atomic clocks to remote islands in the Pacific and Australia before joining NASA JPL where he managed a robotics group focusing on robotic vision and navigation, then NASA Headquarters in biomedical engineering in the Office of Industry Affairs and Technology Transfer. He returned to the JPL Biomedical Application Office through 1984, when he transitioned to Ames for a period including time on the Life Sciences Senior Management Council. He was detailed to TRW in Southern California before returning to NASA Headquarters as Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration. From 1988-1992 he was a member of the committee that created the Space Exploration Initiative – a nationwide planning initiative to take NASA into Extended Duration Exploration Missions, back to the moon and on to Mars. He created the Exploration Advisory Committee and worked with the White House's National Space Council. In 1992, he returned to California and Ames where he developed the Center for Mars Exploration. In the mid-1990s, he created and taught a multi-disciplinary undergraduate course in astrobiology at Santa Clara University. He was also a consultant with Orbitec in Madison, WI. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1992 and Full Member in 1997 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA Academician Horst Rauck (M 2)
19 June 2016: Horst Rauck, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

Born on May 22, 1938 in Offenbach am Main, Horst Rauck studied Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the Technical University Darmstadt. He joined the newly founded space division of MAN-Turbo. In 1969, he became head of energy and space technology. He served as a member of the Executive Board, and then chair, MAN Technologie AG. In 2002 he moved to the Supervisory Board of MAN Technologie where he stayed until the company was sold to OHB/Apollo Capital Partners in 2005. His duties at MAN included the development and early production of the gas centrifuge for uranium enrichment, renewable energy systems and the Ariane launcher family, which brought him into close contact with French industry. From 1987 to 2003 he also was at the Arianespace board.
Horst Rauck was also a Vice-Chair of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) Senate. From 1991 to 2003, he acted as co-chair of the German-Russian council of cooperation in aerospace. He was appointed Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 2000.
 
IAA Academician Jean-Charles Poggi (M2)
30 April 2016: Jean-Charles Poggi, France, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was director of the strategic and space systems division, Aerospatiale (Airbus) and he was president of the French aerospace society AAAF for many years. Graduating from École Polytechnique in 1953, he also obtained a “master of science” from Caltech in 1957. He entered Sud-Aviation soon after, then joined SEREB, a company recently set up to manufacture ballistic missiles for the French nuclear force. He went on to create SETIS, a European design department located in Courbevoie, which worked on development of the Europa launchers for ELDO (European Launcher Development Organisation). When the Europa programme came to a halt, the French members of his hand-picked team were reunited in Aerospatiale. He then became director of programmes for Euromissile, a Franco-German consortium, subsequently joining Aerospatiale as commercial director of the aircraft division, chief of staff of the president and finally director of the strategic and space systems division. In parallel, he founded Corse Composites. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1968 and Full Member in 1984 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
IAA Academician Dietrich Rex
18 April 2016: Dietrich Rex, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

Prof. Rex was a member of the German Delegation to the United Nations Committee for the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. He was the Chairman of the Space Debris Working Group/Advisory Group of ESA, Germany. He lectured on space technology and orbital mechanics, conducted researches into space power systems, satellite re-entry, reliability; he initiated the concentrating solar generator concept currently under industrial development. He was widely recognized as the leading European expert in the space debris field including orbital mechanics and on the safety aspects of nuclear power in space. Author of more than 50 publications. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1989 and Full Member in 1993 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 
Academician Liang Si-Li (IAA M2)
14 April 2016: Liang Si-Li, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

Prof. Liang Si-Li was one of the founders of China space industry and was a famous expert in launch vehicle control system. He served as the consultant of Science and Technology Committee of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. He has served as the Vice-President of the Chinese Academy of Rocket Technology, the Chief Engineer of the Ministry of Astronautics, the vice chairman and consultant of the science and technology council of China National Space Administration. He has been the technical leader of the missile control system technology in China. As the deputy Chief Designer of the long range ground-ground missile and Long March II launch vehicle, he was the first to adopt inertial platform on board computer guidance system. He was elected as Academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He was elected Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1987.

 
Academician Herve Moulin (IAA M4)
07 April 2016: Herve Moulin, France, member of Social Sciences section

He was Managing Director and owner of the Hervé Moulin International (HMI) Company, Paris, France specialized in Space Information and Documentation Consulting (for space agencies and for space industries through press clippings and reports). He had a lifetime interest in space flights and was the founder of the "Club Spatial International". He has worked for SEREB / Aerospatiale with a technical documentation team and has been closely involved in space education in France. He was a member of the IAA Committee on History and he has published many papers on rocketry and history of astronautics (like the “IAA History Symposium – General Index, 1967-2000”). He was elected Corresponding Member in 1995 and Full Member in 2000 of the International Academy of Astronautics.



 
Prof. Martti Tiuri

25 March 2016: Martti Tiuri, Finland, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was Professor emeritus of Helsinki University of Technology HUT (1962-1989) Department of Electrical Engineering, Radio technology lab; and former member of the Finnish parliament (1983-2003), for Kokoomus National Coalition Party, has passed away at 90 years of age. Prof Tiuri received both his masters degree (1950), and his PhD in 1960 at HUT. His PhD thesis on Sputnik 3 was the very first PhD thesis on space technology in Finland. Tiuri was one of the founders of HUT television club which then made the first Finnish TV broadcasting possible on May 24th in 1955. In 1974 Tiuri was one of the founders of Metsähovi Observatory. In 1986 Tiuri became the very first Finnish Fellow of the IEEE. He remained active in the Finnish National Committee of Cospar. Prof Tiuri was elected Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1988, as the first Finnish member.

 
Academician Angelo Miele
19 March 2016: Angelo Miele, USA, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was the Foyt Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Sciences, Rice University, USA. His work included optimal thrust programs for rocket-powered aircraft, optimal cruise of turbojet-powered aircraft and optimal cruise of a hypervelocity glider. In 1959, Miele joined the Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories as director of astrodynamics and flight mechanics. His research at Boeing led to the theorem of image trajectories in Earth-moon space, among his most influential contributions to aerospace studies. Miele joined Rice’s faculty in 1964. In 1967, he founded the Journal of Optimization Theory and Applications, where he remained editor-in-chief until 2009. He was also professor emeritus in computational and applied mathematics at Rice, and he was principal investigator for more than 100 grants, and author or co-author of some 250 journal articles and 400 technical reports and contributions to scientific meetings. His book Flight Mechanics, published in 1962 and translated into Russian in 1965, influenced a generation of aerospace engineers. From 1967 to 1983, Miele’s research focused on numerical methods, first for optimal control problems and then for mathematical programming problems. From 1983 to 1993, his research focused on wave identification, optimal aero-assisted orbital plane change maneuvers, aero-assisted flight experiments, optimal trajectories, flying in wind shear and wind identification and detection. After retirement, he maintained his teaching and research schedule, working in such areas as minimum fuel transfer of a spacecraft from low-Earth orbit to low-lunar and Martian orbit and return, conceptual design of next-generation spacecraft, optimal trajectories for super-maneuvering fighter-jet aircraft, optimization of ship maneuvers, collision-avoidance problems for ships and aircraft, and spacecraft rendezvous problems. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1966 and Full Member in 1984 of the International Academy of Astronautics.
 
Makoto Igarashi
26 January 2016: Makoto Igarashi, Japan, member of Life Sciences section

He was Professor and Director of research, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX, USA. Prof. Makoto Igarashi has made outstanding contributions to basic vestibular physiology using the squirrel monkey model. His work has helped elucidate the complex role of visual and other sensory modalities in compensating for vestibular dysfunction. His investigations have significantly advanced our understanding of human vestibular function in normal and pathological states. He has worked on biomedical instrumentation, space biotechnology and otolaryngology. He was medical officer, Head, otopathology section, US Naval Aerospace Medical Institute. Author of more than 150 publications. Prof. Igarashi was elected Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1984.






























































































 
Dictionaries  -  Prog. Cttee  -  Paper Database  -  Site Map  -  Contact Us