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Path of current page Home arrow Membership arrow Obituary Friday, 01 July 2016
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We regret to inform you of the passing of:


- 19 June 2016: Horst Rauck, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 14 April 2016: Liang Si-Li, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 07 April 2016: Herve Moulin, France, member of Social Sciences section

- 25 March 2016: Martti Tiuri, Finland, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 26 January 2016: Makoto Igarashi, Japan, member of Life Sciences section

- 31 December 2015: Nikolay Tolyarenko, Russia, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 08 December 2015: Hans-Peter Roeser, Germany, member of Basic Sciences section

- 21 October 2015: Frederick C. Durant III, USA, member of Social Sciences section

- 18 October 2015: Robert W. Farquhar, USA, member of Social Sciences section

- 12 October 2015: George E. Mueller, USA, honorary member

- 29 August 2015: Andrea Boese, Germany, member of Life Sciences section

- 28 May 2015: Yury M. Kolosov, Russia, member of Social Sciences section

- 21 May 2015: Harald Posch, Austria, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 16 May 2015: Antonio Fabrizi, Italy, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 10 May 2015: Gunnar Stette, Norway, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 09 April 2015: Alexander Dalgarno, USA, member of Basic Sciences section

- 08 January 2015: Victor P. Legostayev, Russia, member of Engineering Sciences section

- 01 January 2015: Boris V. Morukov, Russia, member of Life Sciences section



 IAA Academician Horst Rauck (M 2)19 June 2016: Horst Rauck, Germany, member of Engineering Sciences section

Born on May 22, 1938 in Offenbach am Main, Horst Rauck studied Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the Technical University Darmstadt. He joined the newly founded space division of MAN-Turbo. In 1969, he became head of energy and space technology. He served as a member of the Executive Board, and then chair, MAN Technologie AG. In 2002 he moved to the Supervisory Board of MAN Technologie where he stayed until the company was sold to OHB/Apollo Capital Partners in 2005. His duties at MAN included the development and early production of the gas centrifuge for uranium enrichment, renewable energy systems and the Ariane launcher family, which brought him into close contact with French industry. From 1987 to 2003 he also was at the Arianespace board.
Horst Rauck was also a Vice-Chair of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) Senate. From 1991 to 2003, he acted as co-chair of the German-Russian council of cooperation in aerospace. He was appointed Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 2000.
 Academician Liang Si-Li (IAA M2)14 April 2016: Liang Si-Li, China, member of Engineering Sciences section

Prof Liang Si-Li was one of the founders of China space industry and was a famous expert in launch vehicle control system. He served as the consultant of Science and Technology Committee of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. He has served as the Vice-President of the Chinese Academy of Rocket Technology, the Chief Engineer of the Ministry of Astronautics, the vice chairman and consultant of the science and technology council of China National Space Administration. He has been the technical leader of the missile control system technology in China. As the deputy Chief Designer of the long range ground-ground missile and Long March II launch vehicle, he was the first to adopt inertial platform on board computer guidance system. He was elected as Academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He was elected Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1987.

 Academician Herve Moulin (IAA M4)07 April 2016: Herve Moulin, France, member of Social Sciences section

He was Managing Director and owner of the Hervé Moulin International (HMI) Company, Paris, France specialized in Space Information and Documentation Consulting (for space agencies and for space industries through press clippings and reports). He had a lifetime interest in space flights and was the founder of the "Club Spatial International". He has worked for SEREB / Aerospatiale with a technical documentation team and has been closely involved in space education in France. He was a member of the IAA Committee on History and he has published many papers on rocketry and history of astronautics (like the “IAA History Symposium – General Index, 1967-2000”). He was elected Corresponding Member in 1995 and Full Member in 2000 of the International Academy of Astronautics.



 Prof. Martti Tiuri
25 March 2016: Martti Tiuri, Finland, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was Professor emeritus of Helsinki University of Technology HUT (1962-1989) Department of Electrical Engineering, Radio technology lab; and former member of the Finnish parliament (1983-2003), for Kokoomus National Coalition Party, has passed away at 90 years of age. Prof Tiuri received both his masters degree (1950), and his PhD in 1960 at HUT. His PhD thesis on Sputnik 3 was the very first PhD thesis on space technology in Finland. Tiuri was one of the founders of HUT television club which then made the first Finnish TV broadcasting possible on May 24th in 1955. In 1974 Tiuri was one of the founders of Metsähovi Observatory. In 1986 Tiuri became the very first Finnish Fellow of the IEEE. He remained active in the Finnish National Committee of Cospar. Prof Tiuri was elected Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1988, as the first Finnish member.

 Makoto Igarashi26 January 2016: Makoto Igarashi, Japan, member of Life Sciences section

He was Professor and Director of research, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX, USA. Prof. Makoto Igarashi has made outstanding contributions to basic vestibular physiology using the squirrel monkey model. His work has helped elucidate the complex role of visual and other sensory modalities in compensating for vestibular dysfunction. His investigations have significantly advanced our understanding of human vestibular function in normal and pathological states. He has worked on biomedical instrumentation, space biotechnology and otolaryngology. He was medical officer, Head, otopathology section, US Naval Aerospace Medical Institute. Author of more than 150 publications. Prof. Igarashi was elected Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics in 1984.
 Nikolay Tolyarenko31 December 2015: Nicolay Tolyarenko, Russia, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was the Director of the Master of Space Studies Program at the International Space University (ISU) at Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France. He had an outstanding Industry, Research and Teaching Career in Russia and at ISU. All his career has been devoted to space related sciences and technics, as researcher, engineer and then as a professor. He was well known as a specialist about orbital mechanic and ballistic problems. He worked in this field at the (then named) NPO Energia consortium, the largest space enterprise in Russia. As an engineer and mathematician, his PhD dissertation of 1969 covered this topic and was named "On Some Problems of the Manned Moon Missions Using Intermediate Orbits". It was related to work he did on the Russian Moon program. Author of 750 publications. He was elected Corresponding Member in 2001 and Full Member in 2006 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

Roeser Hans-Peter
08 December 2015: Hans-Peter Roeser, Germany, member of Basic Sciences section

Academician Hans-Peter Roeser passed away on December 08, 2015 after a serious illness. He was a Full Member of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) of the Section 1 on Basic Sciences (he was elected a corresponding member in 1998 and a full Member in 2003). Prof. Roeser was a member of the IAA Board of Trustees (BOT) and the IAA Scientific Activities Committee (SAC) Vice-Chair for studies. He was director and head of the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at Stuttgart University from 2002 until February 2014 and since then he has been deputy director of the institute. He was the founder of the German SOFIA Institute.  Roeser was the first German on the Kulper Airborne Observatory (KAO). Even the spaceport Baden-Württemberg (RZBW) at Stuttgart University, with about 170 employees one of the largest European scientific research institutions in space, was initiated by Hans-Peter Roeser. He was also the founder and mentor of the Stuttgart small satellite program, in which students can build small satellites. In university education, he formed the IRS a Europe-wide unique range of lectures, practicals and exercises in space technology and space applications. Born in Polch, he studied physics at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University in Bonn. In 1979 he received his doctorate in Applied Physics at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn. In honor of Hans-Peter Roeser the International Astronomical Union has named a minor planet on his name: (52308) Hanspeterröser.

 Frederick C. Durant III21 October 2015: Frederick C. Durant III, USA, member of Social Sciences section

Frederick C. Durant III, an authority on spaceflight and rocketry who for 15 years was an assistant director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, died on October 21, 2015. From 1965 until he retired in 1980, Mr. Durant was a top officer at the Air and Space Museum. He played a key role in building up its space and rocketry collections and its space-art collections. The Air and Space Museum opened on the Mall in 1976. Before joining the Smithsonian’s staff, Mr. Durant was an engineer with E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., a World War II Navy flight instructor and test pilot, a rocket engineer with Bell Aircraft, engineering director at the Naval Rocket Test Station in Dover, N.J., and an aerospace specialist at the management consulting firm Arthur D. Little Inc. in Cambridge, Mass. In the mid 1950s, he helped organize the short-lived Project Orbiter, a joint Army-Navy satellite project headed by aerospace engineer Wernher von Braun. In the 1950s he was president of the American Rocket Society, now known as the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. On retiring from the Smithsonian, Mr. Durant was a consultant and historian with Intelsat. For several years, he was author of the “Rockets and Guided Missiles” and the “Space Exploration” entries in the Encyclopedia Britannica. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1966 and Full Member in 1984 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Robert W. Farquhar18 October 2015: Robert W. Farquhar, USA, member of Social Sciences section

Robert W. Farquhar was a planetary pioneer who designed some of the most esoteric and complex spacecraft trajectories ever attempted. A 50-year veteran of deep-space missions, Farquhar made pivotal contributions to the historic explorations of asteroids and comets. Farquhar joined the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in 1990. During his 16 years at the Laboratory he applied his trajectory design skills, along with extensive space mission experience and unique insight, to a wide range of challenges in mission design and navigation. He played a key role in APL’s initiatives to support deep-space missions through NASA’s Discovery program. He was the Senior Staff Engineer of the Space Department, Johns Hopkins Univ, Applied Physics Lab, Maryland, USA. He made major and unique contributions to calculations of spacecraft trajectories, creating very effective trajectories through the use of natural gravitational forces in the universe. His contributions have led to the acquisition of a great deal of new scientific data because his inventive design of trajectories has made it possible to send spacecraft to close encounters with several different comets. Author of more than 80 publications. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1993 and Full Member in 1996 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 George E. Mueller12 October 2015: George E. Mueller, USA, honorary member

Dr. George E. Mueller (USA) born 16 July 1918, died on 12 October 2015 in California, USA. Dr. George E.Mueller was the President of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) during 16 years from 1982 until 1999. He was elected a corresponding member (CM) of the Academy in 1966 and became a full member (M) in 1978. The IAA Board of Trustees elected the outgoing Academy President George E. Mueller in 1997 an Honorary Member, to join the ranks of astronaut John Glenn (USA) and cosmonauts Adrian Nikolayev and Valentina Nikoloyeva-Tereshkova (Russia). He also received the highest recognition of the Academy, the von Karman Award, in 1999. In 1982 Dr. George E. Mueller when taking the rein of the Academy asked a total revision of the IAA statutes. The main goal was to give the IAA full independence from any other organization and this transformation, prepared in Montreux, Switzerland, in February 1983 occurred during an extraordinary meeting of the Academy in Geneva in October 1983 where he received full support of the members. On this occasion, he created in the Academy membership a social science section that is the home of experts of space law, economy, history, management, etc. He also unlocked the yearly quotas for elections to a maximum of 100 M and CM and this limit is still active today. Shortly after the Montreux historic changes the Academy moved its headquarters to the 6 rue Galilee, Paris 16th France. Dr. George E. Mueller initiated many new standalone conferences that now cumulate 15 to 20 each year, created nearly on hundred committees, initiated the cosmic studies that now cumulate to more than 65 studies published and 40 studies in preparation. No doubt that Dr. George E. Mueller installed the IAA on new tracks that are giving fruits in those years as exemplified by the three heads of space agencies Summit of 2010, 2014 and 2015 that assembled for the first time historic numbers of Chiefs of Agencies for promoting international cooperation. Dr. George E. Mueller began his career at Bell Telephone Lab, became a Professor at Ohio State University, followed by Ramo Wooldrige as Head of the Electronic division where he was responsible for the guidance of Atlas, Titan, Thor and Minuteman ballistic missiles. In 1963 Jim Webb, NASA Administrator asked him to be the head of the manned space flight program, responsible for the Gemini, Apollo/Saturn and related programs. He was the originator of the Skylab and the “father” of the space shuttle. After successful completion of the second lunar landing he became Senior Vice-President of General Dynamics Corp. and later President of System Development Corporation, Senior Vice-President of Burroughs Corporation and finally the key executive in the development of commercial space launcher capability at the Kistler Aerospace Company.

 Andrea Boese29 August 2015: Andrea Boese, Germany, member of Life Sciences section

Academician Andrea Boese, Germany, a true supporter of the International Academy of Astronautics is no longer with us. She passed away at 53. The President, the Board of Trustees and the Secretary General of the Academy and Academicians express grief to her family, her professional colleagues and friends. Elected a corresponding member of the Academy in 2008, she was elected a full member Academician in 2013. She was extremely active as a member of four IAA studies and did not miss any Academy Day during nearly 10 years. Andrea was chair of IAA Life Sciences Commission and actively participated within DLR to the 2010 and 2014 Heads of Space Agencies Summits in Washington DC. Until the recent days she helped prepare the upcoming Heads of Space Agencies Summit on Climate Change and Disaster Management in Mexico in a new capacity at the European Space Agency that she recently joined in July 2015.
At DLR she was Chief Diversity Officer, and prior Manager Strategy and Alliances, Corporate Development and External Relations Department in Cologne, Germany. She has played a significant role in the development of international activities and cooperation in the space life science, both in her previous position at the Institute for Aerospace Medicine in Cologne and in her role at DLR. She has made important contributions to international research cooperation, particularly to cooperation between Germany, Russia and the U.S. She has contributed personally to the cooperative activities, playing a central role in both managing and carrying out these activities. Her investigations in the field of metabolism and, in particular, in the field of mineral metabolism in bone tissue are principally important for the development of new methods and means of countermeasures against adverse effects of weightlessness on human organism, that undoubtedly is personal contribution into the development of space biology and medicine. The Academy has lost an active and respected member.

 Yury M. Kolosov 28 May 2015: Yury M. Kolosov, Russia, member of Social Sciences section

Professor, Dr. Kolosov was born on September 7, 1934 in the Syasstroy city, Leningrad Region, former USSR. He is known in international science and practice as an extraordinary talented, kind and honest person. He contributed significantly to the legal research and formation of sources of law, correspondingly, in the field of the following issues and branches of International Law: International Responsibility and Liability; International Air Law; Mass Media and International Law; International Human Rights Law; and International Space Law (specifically, his contribution to the development of the principles of the International Space Law). He lectured on diverse issues of International Law at many universities all over the world and he is author of over 250 publications, among them 5 monographs. He was elected Full Member in 1985 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Harald Posch21 May 2015: Harald Posch, Austria, member of Engineering Sciences section

Harald Posch's career in the space sector spanned more than three decades, first in industry with Austrian Aerospace and Österreichische Raumfahrt- und Systemtechnik GmbH, then in governmental service. Since 2005, he led Austria's Aeronautics and Space Agency, part of the Research Promotion Agency, the FFG. In this function, he was key in shaping Austria's engagement in space and represented his country in international forums and organisations. He was also instrumental in the setting up of the European Space Policy Institute (ESPI) in Vienna, and served as Chair of its General Assembly since its inception. Within ESA, too, Harald Posch held the most prominent of roles, in particular those of Industrial Policy Committee (IPC) Chair and, from 1 July 2014, Chair of Council. In this latter function, he played a central role in the preparation of last year's Council meeting at ministerial level in Luxembourg. He was elected Corresponding Member in 2010 and Full Member in 2013 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Antonio Fabrizi16 May 2015: Antonio Fabrizi, Italy, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was Director of Launchers at the European Space Agency (ESA), Paris, France. Between 1975 and 1989 he held several positions, and was responsible for feasibility studies on Ariane boosters. In 1990 he was appointed Commercial Manager at Fiat Spazio in charge of developing new initiatives. Then in 1993 he returned to BPD to become head of the Space Transportation Systems Business Unit. From 1997 to 1999 he carried out the same responsibilities for FiatAvio’s Space Business Unit where his duties included responsibility for the Cyclone and Vega programmes. In 2000 he became Vice President of FiatAvio’s Space Business Unit, with responsibility for all space activities. He has held several directorships of companies, including Europropulsion, ELV, Regulus and Arianespace.
He was elected Corresponding Member in 2005 and Full Member in 2010 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Gunnar Stette10 May 2015: Gunnar Stette, Norway, member of Engineering Sciences section

He was a Professor at the Division of Telecommunications, Norwegian Institute of Technology, Norway. He was a Senior Scientist at the SHAPE Technical Center, the Hague, Netherlands, working with the NATO satellite system, NATO II ground communications equipment and NATO III spacecraft communications subsystem. He also was a Senior Scientist at the Electronics Research Laboratory, working with satellite communications projects related to NORSAT, SUDOSAT, INMARSAT. He is responsible for space communications and basic space technology. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1995 and Full Member in 2001 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Alexander Dalgarno
09 April 2015: Alexander Dalgarno, USA, member of Basic Sciences section

Alexander Dalgarno was Known as the "father of molecular astrophysics". He made contributions in theoretical chemistry, scattering theory, atmospheric physics & chemistry and astrophysics. He was a physicist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and was formerly the editor of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. He joined the Harvard department of astronomy in 1967. He held the positions of acting director of Harvard College Observatory, chairman of the department of astronomy, associate director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and director of the Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics. His research covered three main areas: theoretical atomic and molecular physics, astrophysics and aeronomy (the study of the upper atmosphere). He was the author of more than 600 publications. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1971 and Full Member in 1985 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Victor P Legostayev08 January 2015: Victor P. Legostayev, Russia, member of Engineering Sciences section

Professor Victor P. Legostayev was a well-known in the field of control systems development. Since 1955 he was a scientific worker in the Institute of Problems of Control, Academy of Sciences, USSR. Since 1980 he was a member of Intercosmos Council. Since 1986 he was the Chief of the department of Glavcosmos. His main activity ws devoted to control system of space vehicles. He took part in theoretical development of control systems of space vehicles: Vostok, Voskhod, Soyuz, Soyuz-T, and the stations Salyut and Mir. From 1971 to 1975 he took part in the development of the Soviet-American project Soyuz-Apollo. From 1989 to 2014 V.P. Legostaev as Vice-President, First Deputy General Designer headed work under the International Space Projects (The International Space Station and the Sea-Based Rocket and Space Complex Sea Launch), as well as supervises the development of telecommunication satellites and remote sensing satellites, organization of research from board the manned complexes. He was elected Corresponding Member in 1987 and Full Member in 1990 of the International Academy of Astronautics.

 Boris V Morukov01 January 2015: Boris V. Morukov, Russia, member of Life Sciences section

He was Head of Department, State Scientific Centre Russian Federation, Institute for Biomedical Problems RAS, Moscow, Russia. He was a well-known expert at metabolic and immune researches which are performed in the ground experiments, which are simulating physiological effects of the microgravity. His specific interest was focused on the investigation of changes of calcium metabolism and its correction by specific pharmacological agent. He coordinated scientific projects dedicated to the development of countermeasures to the negative metabolic changes that occur during hypokinesia and microgravity. As a cosmonaut-physician, he completed medical training in cardiology, gastroenterology, otolaryngology, stomatology, ophthalmology, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. He participated in a joint American-Russian medical experiment on STS-60, Mir 18/STS-71 and all other Mir-NASA Project Missions. He was elected Corresponding Member in 2005 and Full Member in 2010 of the International Academy of Astronautics.


















































































































 
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